Social Anxiety (2)

This paper provides a brief overview of social anxiety and its treatment. There are several psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological treatment options. Often, a combination of the two leads to superior results. Special emphasis is given to a communication-oriented approach. Since communication is the mechanism which is impaired, communication is also the instrument how the condition and the debilitating symptoms that come with it can be reversed.

Keywords: social anxiety, anxiety, treatment, communication, communication-focused therapy (CFT), CBT, psychodynamic psychotherapy, psychotherapy, psychiatry

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Social Anxiety (2) Christian Jonathan Haverkampf – common mental health conditions series

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Communication-Focused Therapy (CFT) for Borderline Personality Disorder (2)

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a condition that comes with emotional instability, particularly after interpersonal events. Communication-Focused Therapy (CFT) is a psychotherapy developed by the author, which can be applied to several mental health conditions, including borderline personality disorder. The focus is on a change in internal and external communication patterns through observing, awareness, experimentation and insight. Insight into the basic parameters, including needs, values and aspirations, can help the patient to make better decisions and feel more stable in the long-run.

Keywords: borderline personality disorder, BPD, communication-focused therapy, CFT, communication, psychotherapy, treatment

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Communication-Focused Therapy (CFT) for Borderline Personality Disorder (2) Christian Jonathan Haverkampf

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Depression and Psychotherapy (6)

Abstract – Depression has become highly treatable and this article explores some ways of treating it with the use of psychotherapy. The approach presented is a communication focused psychotherapy which has been developed and described by the author before. Psychotherapy alone may not be sufficient in more severe cases, where medication is usually added to bring faster relief to the symptoms of depression, which also facilitates the psychotherapeutic treatment.

Keywords: depression, psychotherapy

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Depression and Psychotherapy (6) Christian Jonathan Haverkampf

Burnout and Psychotherapy (3)

Burnout is largely determined by how connected one is with oneself and others. The quantity of messages from oneself and the world is not what causes burnout, but how one selects and processes the messages, which is also related to the ability to draw healthy boundaries. Openness and transparency can prevent burnout on an organisational level. On an individual level, the communication with oneself is important, the identification of own needs, values and aspirations. Treatment of burnout needs to focus on the self-communication, the discovery of more meaning in one’s daily life, and especially so one’s true values, interests and aspirations, and on the communication used in interaction with others. In therapy, awareness for and experimentation with communication patterns and styles in self-communication and communication with others is very helpful in the treatment of burnout and the symptoms associated with it.

Keywords: burnout, psychotherapy, treatment

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Burnout and Psychotherapy (3) Christian Jonathan Haverkampf

Anxiety and Panic Attacks (5)

Abstract – Anxieties can cause incredible suffering, especially in combination with panic attacks, which are usually a short-lived but more intense form of anxiety. At the foundation is often a subconscious, or sometimes partially conscious, feeling that something in life is ‘out of sync’. Anxiety is often triggered by interpersonal difficulties, such as relationship breakups or human problems at the work place. The less one has a good sense of oneself, one’s values, interests and needs, the more difficult interactions and communication with others can become, the lower is one’s resilience in conflicts and situations of divergent interests. All this can induce and maintain anxiety. While a predisposition for anxiety has been shown on the molecular biological and the epidemiological level, it usually is triggered and maintained by conflicts on the inside or the outside. Psychotherapy has been shown to be very effective in treating anxiety disorder and panic attacks.

Keywords: anxiety, panic attacks, psychotherapy

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Anxiety and Panic Attacks (5) Christian Jonathan Haverkampf

Self-Confidence (3)

Abstract – Many people suffering from depression or other mental health conditions feel that low self-confidence is at the root of many of their problems. Self-confidence is primarily a feeling, and while it is usually a signal or symptom of the underlying condition, it can be a valuable topic in psychotherapy in its own regard if part of a more complete treatment approach.

Low self-confidence is a result of a disconnect with oneself, which can be countered effectively with improved communication with oneself and others. Objectives in therapy can be to build a better sense of self and greater efficacy in communicating with others. In most cases, this resolves the patient’s preoccupation with self-confidence and helps to get a greater sense of confidence in interactions with others, ultimately making self-confidence a ‘non-issue’.

Keywords: self-confidence, psychotherapy

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Self-Confidence (3) Christian Jonathan Haverkampf

 

OCD and Psychotherapy (4)

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a condition in which people feel the need to check things repeatedly, perform certain routines repeatedly (‘rituals’), or have certain thoughts repeatedly. People are unable to control either the thoughts or the activities for any longer periods of time. Suppressing the behavior or thoughts often causes intense feelings of anxiety, tension, nervousness and fear. OCD is quite common, and it is mostly treated with a combination of psychotherapy and medication.

Keywords: OCD, psychotherapy

 

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